Psalm 121: Anglican Chant with a congregational response

Continuing with the inclusion of psalms to our liturgy during Lent, on 20th March at St Andrew’s we sang Psalm 121. This is a favourite of mine and of many others, and I wanted to use Anglican Chant this time. There are various chants that can be used; the one by H. Walford Davies, with solos in the first and third quarters, is certainly well-known. But it wasn’t really appropriate for our very small choir, which doesn’t have enough voices to cover four parts. Instead I used a chant by Phocion Henley, who I know better as the composer of many West Gallery tunes.

We still needed a congregational response. I made this one by using the last half of the chant, keeping the rhythm simple:


It worked a treat.

This past Sunday we had a said psalm, which I must say I didn’t find nearly as rewarding. Next week is Mothering Sunday and we are having an All Age Chaos Service. Happily the psalm appointed for that day is Psalm 34, which has actually made it into our hymnal thinly disguised as a hymn: “Through all the changing scenes of life” is from Tate and Brady’s “New Version” of the psalms, published in 1696. We will sing it to the Common Meter tune “Wiltshire”, attributed to George Smart (1776-1867) and originally set to Psalm 48. This is relatively familiar to the congregation and choir alike so everyone will sing, rather than my fussing about with responses.

That leaves me with Psalm 130 (Passion Sunday), Psalm 31 vv 9-16 (Palm Sunday), and Psalm 22 (Maundy Thursday, during the stripping of the altar) to sort out; we won’t have sung psalmody on Good Friday or during our Easter Vigil. I’m planning on metrical psalms with congregational responses for the first two, but that won’t work for Maundy Thursday; for that, I think it will be a unison chanted psalm with alternate lines by a soloist and the rest of the choir.

I’ve enjoyed working with the psalms so far and trying different ways of fitting in the congregational responses, and I will miss them.

Comments

Psalm 121: Anglican Chant with a congregational response — 1 Comment

  1. For the last few weeks I have had the privilege of attending Evensong at Canterbury Cathedral.After more then two years in the church, I have been exposed to the beauty of liturgy, sung so well in the Anglican Tradition.Hearing the Psalms sung in this way, brings them home to you in a way, not experienced in such depth in reading them or just attending normal matins in my Parish.Loads to learn, but I want this to be part of my worship life.